WAR DRUMS OF THE 1800’s, Warriors of the Sioux, Arikara, Mandan and Hidatsa speak of their Battles. NOW ON KINDLE!

This is new book is a significant improvement on the web site entry. We have learned a lot about creating books since the material for the web site was entered.   Col. A.B. Welch (Author, 1924), Everett Cox (Editor), Catherine Cox Rivers (Editor)   Be the first to review this item http://www.amazon.com/War-Drums-1800s-Warriors-Arikara-ebook/dp/B00Q12VDCA/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1420043848&sr=1-1&keywords=war+drums+of+the+1800%27s   Then type in to Search:  War Drums of the 1800’s   Kindle Price: $6.49 Book Description Publication Date: December 30, 2014 A rare and deeply personal look into the lives of Dakota Indian warriors during the mid to late 1800’s. These elders come alive in these original interviews preserved and compiled by Col. A.B. Welch. Illustrated with over 75 fully annotated photographs, you can’t help but be moved by the beauty and charisma of these people. “War Drums” was written by Col. Welch in 1924. This manuscript records his conversations with old warriors of the Sioux, Arikara, Mandan and Hidatsa tribes. Welch’s writings are essentially unedited. The stories are presented in their original order. Photographs and three stories from his collection have been added to enrich the manuscript. See and read the letters that prompted the arrest and subsequent death of Sitting Bull. Read the first hand account of Sitting Bull’s arrest from Red Tomahawk as told to Col. Welch. Learn about the bravery of these people in the stories of ‘The Stone by the Road,’ ‘Four Bears’ Revenge’ and ‘The Battle of the Buttes’. Hear the words of Charging Bear, Crows Heart, Enemy Heart, Red Tomahawk as you read their interviews. Col. Welch, born 1874, became acquainted with these people of the plains as a child at play with young Sioux children. His family was living on their Dakota homestead in the 1880’s when, unknown to them at the time, the Sioux had considered kidnapping this six year old boy to raise as one of their own. Thirty-nine years later, in 1913, Col. Welch was indeed symbolically kidnapped and adopted by the Sioux Nation, becoming the son of the revered Chief John Grass. Col. Welch served in the Philippines Insurrection of 1898-99, helped to chase Pancho Villa in 1917 and then, in 1918, fought in France in the trenches of World War I along with his Indian recruits. His adopted status, his being recognized as a warrior, along with his deep feelings for these people, undoubtedly helped him gain their confidence. He was related to and spoken to as an Indian, not as just to another white man. He operated The Golden Rule Department Store upon his return from France and was postmaster of Mandan in the 1920’s until 1932. His Golden Rule account book shows the cost of articles taken, but few records of payments. Many of these stories originated from his Indian friends dropping in for chats, purchases and trades. Col. Welch recognized the plight of these people and the cultural losses that were occurring even in the early 1900’s. He was an avid recorder of conversations, documenter of photographs and collector of letters and news articles. Welch could speak a little of the various Dakotah languages, but it was his practice to use an Indian interpreter so he could compare notes and come as close as possible to what the old men meant to say both in words and gestures. I would hope that you will treat this book as a way to gain access to the minds of these people, many who were born as early as the 1830’s, and to learn a bit of how they lived before the white man took away their Nations. And lastly, that you gain a sense of this man who fell in love with a people and their story, going to great lengths to see that their legacy was preserved....

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War Drums (Genuine War Stories from the Sioux, Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara), written by Col. A. B. Welch, a

Until 1883 there was no restriction by the Government on Indians Killing each other…This might help you to better understand some of the cruelty and seemingly senseless killing in their battles.   ***************************************************************** Story No. 1:  Death of Montana Miners and Burning of the Boat ***************************************************************** Story No. 2: The Stone by the Road ***************************************************************** Story No. 3: The Battle of the Buttes ***************************************************************** Story No. 4: “Last Hill Village” fight  ***************************************************************** Story No. 5: The Sioux fight at Berthold             ***************************************************************** Story No. 6: Tabloid History of Hollow Horn Bear              ***************************************************************** Story No. 7: Pezhi (Chief John Grass) strikes the Arikara             ***************************************************************** Story No. 8: Sioux make peace with Northern Cheyenne    ***************************************************************** Story No. 9: Pierre Garreau escapes from the Assiniboine   ***************************************************************** Story No. 9a:The Arikara come to Berthold     ***************************************************************** Story No. 10: Coups, in one Day, of Chief John Grass     ***************************************************************** Story No. 11: Enemy Heart’s views on old times versus new times    ***************************************************************** Story No. 12: Caught in their own trap by the Gros Ventre and Mandans  ***************************************************************** Story No. 13: Hobu (Bristling) receives his Name   ***************************************************************** Story No. 14: An unrecorded battle … Cheyennes and Mandans ***************************************************************** Story No. 15: The Gros Ventre ambush the Chippewa    ***************************************************************** Story No. 16: The Assiniboine attack the Gros Ventre    ***************************************************************** Story No. 17: Four Bears’ revenge ***************************************************************** Story No. 18: Four Bears’ revenge (Catlin version)    ***************************************************************** Story No. 19: Mato Topa fights Cheyenne Chief   ***************************************************************** Story No. 20: The Death of Good Chaser ***************************************************************** Story No. 21: Heraldric device of the Arikara  ***************************************************************** Story No. 22: Killing of families of Grey Bear and Flying By   ***************************************************************** Story No. 23: Bloody Robe Winter, 1859    ***************************************************************** Story No. 24: Campeska Imanipi Win refers to Bloody Robe   ***************************************************************** Story No. 25: Campeska Imanipi Win gives Sioux History…Mentions wars and forays ***************************************************************** Story No. 26: Black Eyes on war path  ***************************************************************** Story No. 27: Istapi prays for help   ***************************************************************** Story No. 28: Chip Creighton’s outfit fights the Sioux    ***************************************************************** Story No. 29: Death of Archambeau     ***************************************************************** Story No. 30: Mandan and Sioux Heraldry      ***************************************************************** Story No. 31: Young Man Afraid of His Horses prevented a massacre of whites, 1865    ***************************************************************** Story No. 32: Story of Painted Lake     ***************************************************************** Story No. 33: Bears Rib talks to Ross Anderson      ***************************************************************** Story No. 34: The Indian Scout’s discharge       ***************************************************************** Story No. 35: Spicer Family killed      ***************************************************************** Story No. 36: Burning of a Mandan village     ***************************************************************** Story No. 37: Yellow Horse talks about battle on James River, 1863     ***************************************************************** Story No. 38: Sitting Bull among the Mandans      ***************************************************************** Story No. 39: Grave of Sitting Bull, 1920 sketch    ***************************************************************** Story No. 40: The Fool Soldier band         ***************************************************************** Story No. 41: Presentation of Ceremonial Tipi to Welch, 1915      ***************************************************************** Story No. 42: Charging Bear counts coup        ***************************************************************** Story No. 43: Red Fox goes to battle         *********************************************** Story No. 44: Song of the Warpath     ***************************************************************** Story No. 45: Sioux song for honored enemy (Bloody Knife)      ********************************************** Story No. 46: Coups of Red Fish…his personal pictographs      ***************************************************************** Story No. 47: Hunka Topa talks about the Pabaska       ***************************************************************** Story No. 48: Red Tomahawk’s story of the Sitting Bull fight, 1890…”I killed him” ***************************************************************** Story No. 49: Welch publishes Red Tomahawk’s story of the SB Fight ***************************************************************** Story No. 50: Sitting Bull’s Camp ***************************************************************** Story No. 51: Letter causing McLaughlin to order arrest of Sitting Bull ***************************************************************** Story No. 52: McLaughlin’s orders for the arrest of Sitting Bull *****************************************************************   Story No. 1:  Death of Montana Miners and Burning of the Boat  I have often heard several men of the Sioux make veiled remarks about this (1864) incident for some years before I finally succeeded in obtaining a story regarding it.  The Indians appeared to be reticent about discussing it, apparently being afraid that they might be punished for it even at this late date, after treaties had been signed in which all acts of hostility had been mutually forgotten and forgiven.  However, when I talked with them regarding the Sibley Expedition, I began to get more of the facts as the Sioux knew them. There are many men alive today, who were young me at that time and who were fighting at the Big Mound north of Tappen, Dead Buffalo Lake north of Dawson, and along the trail from there to where the Indians were forced across to the west side of the Missouri river, at Sibley Island.  It is from these old men that I have the information as herein given, as well as stories told to me by several white men and Mandan and Arikara, who were in a position to...

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Sioux Nation Pow-Wow and the Making of a Movie, Nov 17, 1912

Where,  Oh Where, is this extremely valuable and historic film? (Circular Family Letter written by A. B. Welch, Nov. 17, 1912)  Blow-up  of Detail in the above...

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A. B. Welch letter of October 22, 1913 describing visit to Fort Yates and discussions about Custer with “Old Timers”

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Winter Counts, their Pictographic Histories

Winter Counts, their Pictographic Histories

 (This site is under construction as of June 20, 2013) . . . . INDEX Blue Thunder’s Winter Count American Horse’s Winter Count A Hunkpapa Winter Count Jaws’ Winter Count Lone Dog’s Winter Count No Two Horns’ Winter Count ******************************************** Blue Thunder’s Winter Count ************************************* *************************************** Right side enlarged (top) Left side enlarged (bottom) ******************************************** ******************************** American Horse’s Winter Count ********************************** ********************************** ********************************** ********************************** ********************************** ********************************** *********************************** A  Hunkpapa Winter Count *********************************** *********************************** ************************************ Jaws’ Winter Count ************************************* Lone Dog’s Winter Count ************************************* ************************************* ************************************* ************************************* ************************************ No Two Horns’ Winter Count ************************************ ******************************** ********************************* ********************************** *********************************** ****************************************...

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Tipi Structure and Design

(this post is under construction as of June 19, 2013) Col. A. B. Welch was presented with a large tipi on July 7, 1915.   Following are his notes on this celebration. ************************************** ************************************* ******************************* ********************************** ******************************** ********************************** ********************************** *********************************** *********************************** ***************************** ********************************** ***************************************...

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Little Stories of the Dakota Territory in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s

( Story No. 1 – Post also under construction) SITTING BULL AND  THE BOTTLE OF HORSE RADISH: It is told of him that, while a guest at some officer’s dinner party (probably Fort Yates in the mid 1880’s), he saw a bottle of fresh horse radish on the table.  He helped himself liberally, with the assistance of the blade of his knife, and put the entire ‘load’ into his mouth.  He then passed the bottle around to the other Indians who each took a knife blade full and ate it.  Great tears rolled down their cheeks, but not a word was said by any of them until the last Indian had taken a mouthful of the stinking root.  Then they all broke out laughing and talking and joking one another.   FROM welchdakotapapers.com In the Master Index, click “Sitting Bull his last days”  (source: Major A. B. Welch collection)  ********************************************** Story No. 2…  CHIEF JOHN GRASS COMMENTS TO WELCH (1915) ON THE EVILS OF WHISKEY AND ADULTERY Story No. 3…  LITTLE BRAVE AND HIS PINTO PONY Story No. 4…  HOW “BRISTLING” GOT HIS NAME Story No. 5...  HOW BLOODY KNIFE DIED WITH CUSTER Story No. 6..  .ALBERT GRASS DIED A TRUE WARRIOR IN THE TRENCHES OF FRANCE, 1918 Story No. 7...  MRS. WELCH DINES WITH SITTING BULL: Story No. 8...  He-Yo-Ka Story No. 9…  SIOUX VENGEANCE Story No. 10…THUNDERBIRD – (Red Fish Pictograph, 1915) Story No. 11…THE SIOUX ADOPT A BRAVE ENEMY Story No. 12 ...CROW MAN EXPLAIN S THE “COUP” TO ME, 1921: Story No. 13...COUPS OF CHIEF JOHN GRASS    *****************************************************   Story No. 2   CHIEF JOHN GRASS COMMENTS TO WELCH (1915) ON THE EVILS OF WHISKEY AND ADULTERY Two Indian men and one woman were in the penitentiary at Bismarck: one of the men for horse stealing, and the other and the woman for adultery.  After we had gone through the pen and were again at the office, John Grass sent for the Indian inmates and the Warden had them brought to the office.  Grass gave them a good lot of advice.  In his talking to them he told them that:  “There are two things which the Dakotah people should be careful about.  They are the two worst evils of all: running off with another man’s wife and whiskey.”  “If a man did not drink whiskey, he probably would not run off with another man’s wife, so drinking is perhaps the worst evil of the two.”  “When you feel like you want another man’s woman,” he said, “go down into the timber where the little trees grow.  Cut a nice little one, and then switch it a while and it will  not be so anxious to go.”   FROM welchdakotapapers.com In the Master Index, click “Chief John Grass”  (source: Major A. B. Welch collection)  ********************************************** Story No. 3 LITTLE BRAVE AND HIS PINTO PONY Fort Berthold visit, October 1921, by Welch: After walking through the ruined village we went to the grave of the Scouts to the northeast of the old site.  These graves of 102 Scouts, who served the United States Army in the early days, all lie together in a well-kept plot.  The flag flies on important days from a tall staff and each grave is marked by a U.S. headstone.  The Scouts Little Brave, Bob Tail Bull and Bloody Knife were all killed with Custer and their bodies were buried where found.  The stones, however, are erected at Berthold. Later in the ceremonies, the people sung a song about Little Brave, which ran something like this: The pinto horse came home alone. Little Brave never came again.  They told me that Little Brave had ridden a pinto pony, which long after the fight on the Little Big Horn, came into the camp from across the river and walked around, neighing, and seemed to be hunting for the Indian Scout.  They treated the horse very well and never allowed any one to ride it but a brave man after that.   FROM welchdakotapapers.com In the Master Index, click “Survivors of the Little Big Horn speak”  (source: Major A. B. Welch collection)  **********************************************  Story No. 4 HOW “BRISTLING” GOT HIS NAME Bristling (Hobu) is a name referred to by Elk in a talk with Welch, September 12th, 1922: Hobu (Bristling) got his name this way.  He was shot by the enemy so many times.  He had a lot of arrows sticking in him.  He was a great warrior then.  They called him Bristling for that.  Some other people call him Wahinkpe Mani (Walking Arrow).   FROM welchdakotapapers.com In the Master Index, click “Indian Biographies”  (source: Major A. B. Welch...

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